Skip to main content
Counselor

Sarah Hadfield
Sarah Hadfield, M.A., LMHC, NBCC

APS Professional School Counselor

(505) 281-0880

Sarah.Hadfield@aps.edu

Community Resources

NM Crisis Hotline: 
1-855-NMCRISIS

Southwest Family Guidance Center:
(505) 830-1871

APS Title 1 Resources for Families:
(505) 253-0330

Counselor

covid

As part of the APS Continuous Learning Plan, the school counselor is available for office hours Monday-Friday from 1:00-2:00. The counselor may be reached during office hours at 505-750-8130.  If you need to reach the counselor outside of office hours, please email sarah.hadfield@aps.edu or call 505-750-8130. 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the school counselor is available to support students and families who are experiencing stress and anxiety.  If you need to speak with the counselor or are in need of resources, please contact Sarah Hadfield at sarah.hadfield@aps.edu or 505-750-8130.

In addition, the New Mexico Crisis and Access Line is available to you 24/7 and can be reached at

1-855-NMCRISIS. 

resource

 

 

 

Guidance and Counseling services are provided by a licensed mental health professional. Students, parents, teachers, and staff may consult with the counselor on a confidential basis. If a student is not feeling happy or successful at school, the counselor may be of help.

Services provided:

  • Consulting with community members
  • Individual counseling sessions with students upon referral
  • Small group counseling
  • Classroom guidance lessons at teacher request

When a child is referred for counseling services, the counselor will contact the parents/guardians before counseling sessions begin.

Meet the counselor to discuss any of the following:

  • Friendships & Relationships
  • Family changes
  • Grief issues
  • Mistreatment
  • Mediation
  • Safety concerns (for yourself or others)

Attendance Facts

Help Your Child Succeed in School: Build the Habit of Good Attendance Early

Did you know: 

  • Students should miss no more than 9 days of school each year to stay on track to graduation.
  • Absences can be a sign that a student is losing interest in school, struggling with school work, dealing with mistreatment or facing other serious problems.
  • By 6th grade, absenteeism is a sign that a student may drop out of high school.
  • By 9th grade, regular attendance is a better predictor of graduation rates than 8th-grade test scores.
  • Students can be chronically absent even if they only miss a day or two every few weeks.
  • Attendance is an important life skill that will help your child graduate from college and keep a job.

What you can do:

  • Make school attendance a priority. 
  • Talk about the importance of showing up to school every day. 
  • Help your child maintain daily routines, such as finishing homework and getting a good night’s sleep.
  • Try not to schedule dental and medical appointments during the school day.
  • Don’t let your child stay home unless truly sick. Complaints of headaches or stomachaches may be signs of anxiety.
  • Help your child stay engaged.
  • Find out if your child feels engaged by his classes and feels safe from mistreatment. Make sure he/she is not missing class because of behavioral issues and school  discipline policies. If any of these are problems, work with your school. 
  • Stay on top of academic progress and seek help from teachers or tutors if necessary. Make sure teachers know how to contact you. 
  • Stay on top of your child’s social contacts. Peer pressure can lead to skipping school, while students without many friends can feel isolated.
  • Communicate with the school. 
  • Know the school’s attendance policy.
  • Talk to teachers if you notice sudden changes in behavior. These could be tied to something going on at school.  
  • Check on your child's attendance to be sure absences are not piling up.
  • Ask for help from school officials, afterschool programs, other parents or community agencies if you’re having trouble getting your child to school.